Scouter Development -A Lay Apostolate Formation Program for Adults in Scouting as Youth Ministry

Come Share, Grow, Develop and Lead!

When: September 19, 2015

Where: Beaumont Scout Reservation

(held in conjunction with the Encounter Weekend Retreat )

Cost:  $10 per person OR take advantage of our Two-4-One Special.

Two-4-One Special-If you are signed up to attend the Encounter Weekend with your troop and will be camping with your unit, there is no additional charge to attend the Scouter Development! 

Register online or via fax, e-mail or US mail at:

Office of Catholic Scouting                      

20 Archbishop May Drive           E-mail: annlederman@archstl.org

St. Louis, MO  63119                Online:  http://registration.stlyouth.org/form/scouter-development-regis

314-792-7608     Fax:  314-792-7619 

Fee includes course materials, meals and accommodations


 

 

 

 

The Lay Apostolate Formation for Scouting program is a revision in approach and language from the original Scouter Development program. The revision makes more use of adult learning principles. In the past, not all members of the people of God have had equal access to religious and spiritual formation. The “explorations” will help to put what Scouters experience in the context of the traditions of the Catholic Church. The revised program is designed to help all participants to trust and to be comfortable with each other. Through guided reflection and active participation, Scouters discern how they are called by Christ and his church to leadership, to holiness, to conversion, and to worship. Adult formation occurs most completely when adults both listen to other adults and exchange their ideas and experiences with them. Throughout the process, participants recognize the prompting of the Holy Spirit within a small community of faith. The “textbook” for this formation program is the Bible. The words and deeds of Jesus and his disciples will provide most of the instruction. Those who keep their eyes and minds set on Christ can be fully prepared for service. It will be important to have a copy of the Bible, to read aloud from it, and to reflect silently on what is heard. Scouters are encouraged to write down their thoughts. As they become more comfortable with other participants, they are invited to share their reflections with each other.

 What is Lay Apostolate Formation?
 
This revised program has been developed for Scouters who seek to form and inform themselves as disciples of Christ. These Scouters then share their formation and information with other Scouters and Scouts, not only by what they say, but also by what they do. Participation in this program, then, prepares Scouters better to offer their talents and charisms in the service of the church.
 
 
 
 
The Second Vatican Council (1963-65) issued a universal call to holiness. Holiness is not reserved or the spiritual elite; rather, everyone is called to grow in holiness. In addition, spirituality can now be defined from the perspective of relationships. The key question is: “Am I growing in my relationship with God, with others, and with myself?” Each member of the body of Christ has a responsibility for the entire body. The whole Church is apostolic, in that she remains, through the successors of St. Peter and the other apostles, in communion of faith and life with her origin: and in that she is ‘sent out’ into the whole world. All members of the Church share in this mission, though in various ways. ‘The Christian vocation is, of its nature, a vocation to the apostolate as well.’ Indeed, we call an apostolate ‘every activity of the Mystical Body’ that aims ‘to spread the Kingdom of Christ over all the earth.’ ( CCC 863  )
 
 
The laity are those of the Christian faithful who, “by their very vocation, seek the kingdom of God by engaging in temporal affairs and by ordering them according to the plan of God.” (
 
 
Dogmatic Constitution on the Church – Lumen Gentium , 31).
 
 
The clergy, on the other hand, are those of the Christian faithful who, by their particular vocations are chiefly and  professedly ordained to the sacred ministry. ( Lumen Gentiumthe apostolate of the laity complement each other so that the whole mission of the church can be accomplished. Hence the apostolate of the church and of all her members is primarily designed to manifest Christ’s message by words and deeds and to communicate his grace to the world. This work is done mainly through the ministry of the word and of the sacraments, which are entrusted in a special way to the clergy. But the laity too have their very important roles to play if they complement each other so that the whole mission of the church can be accomplished. Dogmatic Constitution on the Church –, 31). The ministry of the clergy and the apostolate of the laity complement each other so that the whole mission of the church can be accomplished. Hence the apostolate of the church and of all her members is primarily designed to manifest Christ’s message by words and deeds and to communicate his grace to the world. This work is done mainly through the ministry of the word and of the sacraments, which are entrusted in a special way to the clergy. But the laity too have their very important roles to play if they are to be ‘fellow-workers for the truth’ (3 Jn 8). It is especially on this level that the apostolate of the laity and the pastoral ministry complement one another.” (Laity – Apostolatum actuositatem Decree on the Apostolate of the. 6).
 
The laity were certainly involved in bringing the Gospel message to the secular world throughout the early ages of the church. However, the lay apostolate eventually fell into disuse and remained so for many centuries. Pope Pius X was he first modern pope to promote the lay apostolate, referring to it by the term Catholic Action. While not much was heard bout Catholic Action in the United States, it became widespread first in Italy and then through other European bountries. Pope Pius X’s successor, Pope Pius XI, strongly promoted Catholic Action, imbuing it with a sense of apocalyptic urgency. It was Pope Pius XI who realized that the layperson’s life in the world had to be dynamically related to the church’s mission.Following him, Pope Pius XII continued to urge Catholic Action throughout the 1940s and it was during this time that the term Catholic Action gradually gave way to the more general term, lay apostolate. This term referred to all Catholic lay activity no matter whether it was organized or not, under Episcopal mandate or not. The Second Vatican Council, in several documents, underscored the validity and necessity of the lay apostolate. Most notable are the two quoted above, Lumen Gentium and Current examples of the organized lay apostolate in the United States are The National Catholic Committee on Scouting, the Christian Family Movement, Serra International and Catholic interracial councils. With increased activity of the laity in the church, certain difficulties and dangers have arisen in the post-conciliar path of the lay faithful, states Pope John Paul II, In particular, two temptations can be cited which they have not always known how to avoid: the temptation of being so strongly interested in church services and tasks that some fail to become actively engaged in their responsibilities in the professional, social, cultural and political world; and the temptation of legitimizing the unwarranted separation of faith from life…” ( Christian Faithful – Christifideles laici In the role of the laity should always be “in conformity to their specific vocation, which is different from that of the sacred ministry. Their own field of evangelizing activity is the vast and complicated world of politics, society and economics, as well as the world of culture, of the sciences and the arts, of international life, of the mass media. It also includes other realities which are open to evangelization, such as human love, the family, the education of children and adolescents, professional work and suffering” ( 23).
 
 
In the Catholic Church in the United States, more and more lay persons are participating in the work of the ordained clergy, being so strongly interested in church services and tasks, rather than bringing the Gospel message to the world outside of the church. They are often termed “ministers”. Pope John Paul, however, states that, “in fact, a person is not a minister simply in performing a task, but through sacramental ordination” ( Apostolatum actuositatem.The Lay, 2).Christifideles laici, Pope John Paul II notes thatChristifideles laici,Christifideles laici, 23).  Catholic Scouters, on their part, do fulfill the role of the lay apostolate. Their involvement in the secular realm of the Boy Scouts of America, gives them the opportunity to carry out the necessary task of evangelizing the secular world, especially through education of children and adolescents. Lay Scouters collaborate with their priest-chaplains to carry out the church’s mission in this area of American life. This program, Scouter Development: Lay Apostolate Formation for Scouting, responds to the direction given in Christifideles laici for forming the laity for their apostolates.
 
Groups, associations and movements also have their place in the formation of the lay faithful. In fact, they have the possibility, each with its own method, of offering a formation through a deeply shared experience in the apostolic life, as well as having the opportunity to integrate, to make concrete and specific the formation that their members receive from other persons and communities (Christifideles laici, 62).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Having been prepared through this Scouter Development program and through their continued prayer, education and experience, lay Catholic
 
 Scouters will be better enabled to manifest the dignity of the laity as they fulfill the noble task of the lay apostolate.
 
 Further reading The Second Vatican Council:  Apostolatum actuositatem (Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity), Lumen Gentium (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church), Gaudium et Spes (The Church in the Modern World). Christifideles laici

Why a Program of Lay Apostolate Formation for Scouting?

The Lay Apostolate Formation for Scouting program is a revision in approach and language from the original Scouter Development program. The revision makes more use of adult learning principles. In the past, not all members of the people of God have had equal access to religious and spiritual formation. The “explorations” will help to put what Scouters experience in the context of the traditions of the Catholic Church. The revised program is designed to help all participants to trust and to be comfortable with each other. Through guided reflection and active participation, Scouters discern how they are called by Christ and his church to leadership, to holiness, to conversion, and to worship. Adult formation occurs most completely when adults both listen to other adults and exchange their ideas and experiences with them. Throughout the process, participants recognize the prompting of the Holy Spirit within a small community of faith. The “textbook” for this formation program is the Bible. The words and deeds of Jesus and his disciples will provide most of the instruction. Those who keep their eyes and minds set on Christ can be fully prepared for service. It will be important to have a copy of the Bible, to read aloud from it, and to reflect silently on what is heard. Scouters are encouraged to write down their thoughts. As they become more comfortable with other participants, they are invited to share their reflections with each other.

 What is Lay Apostolate Formation?

 This revised program has been developed for Scouters who seek to form and inform themselves as disciples of Christ. These Scouters then share their formation and information with other Scouters and Scouts, not only by what they say, but also by what they do. Participation in this program, then, prepares Scouters better to offer their talents and charisms in the service of the church.

The Second Vatican Council (1963-65) issued a universal call to holiness. Holiness is not reserved or the spiritual elite; rather, everyone is called to grow in holiness. In addition, spirituality can now be defined from the perspective of relationships. The key question is: “Am I growing in my relationship with God, with others, and with myself?” Each member of the body of Christ has a responsibility for the entire body. The whole Church is apostolic, in that she remains, through the successors of St. Peter and the other apostles, in communion of faith and life with her origin: and in that she is ‘sent out’ into the whole world. All members of the Church share in this mission, though in various ways. ‘The Christian vocation is, of its nature, a vocation to the apostolate as well.’ Indeed, we call an apostolate ‘every activity of the Mystical Body’ that aims ‘to spread the Kingdom of Christ over all the earth.’ ( CCC 863  ) 
The laity are those of the Christian faithful who, “by their very vocation, seek the kingdom of God by engaging in temporal affairs and by ordering them according to the plan of God.”                                   ( Dogmatic Constitution on the Church – Lumen Gentium , 31). 

The clergy, on the other hand, are those of the Christian faithful who, by their particular vocations are chiefly and  professedly ordained to the sacred ministry. ( Lumen Gentiumthe apostolate of the laity complement each other so that the whole mission of the church can be accomplished. Hence the apostolate of the church and of all her members is primarily designed to manifest Christ’s message by words and deeds and to communicate his grace to the world. This work is done mainly through the ministry of the word and of the sacraments, which are entrusted in a special way to the clergy. But the laity too have their very important roles to play if they complement each other so that the whole mission of the church can be accomplished. Dogmatic Constitution on the Church –, 31). The ministry of the clergy and the apostolate of the laity complement each other so that the whole mission of the church can be accomplished. Hence the apostolate of the church and of all her members is primarily designed to manifest Christ’s message by words and deeds and to communicate his grace to the world. This work is done mainly through the ministry of the word and of the sacraments, which are entrusted in a special way to the clergy. But the laity too have their very important roles to play if they are to be ‘fellow-workers for the truth’ (3 Jn 8). It is especially on this level that the apostolate of the laity and the pastoral ministry complement one another.” (Laity – Apostolatum actuositatem Decree on the Apostolate of the. 6).

The laity were certainly involved in bringing the Gospel message to the secular world throughout the early ages of the church. However, the lay apostolate eventually fell into disuse and remained so for many centuries. Pope Pius X was he first modern pope to promote the lay apostolate, referring to it by the term Catholic Action. While not much was heard bout Catholic Action in the United States, it became widespread first in Italy and then through other European bountries. Pope Pius X’s successor, Pope Pius XI, strongly promoted Catholic Action, imbuing it with a sense of apocalyptic urgency. It was Pope Pius XI who realized that the layperson’s life in the world had to be dynamically related to the church’s mission.Following him, Pope Pius XII continued to urge Catholic Action throughout the 1940s and it was during this time that the term Catholic Action gradually gave way to the more general term, lay apostolate. This term referred to all Catholic lay activity no matter whether it was organized or not, under Episcopal mandate or not. The Second Vatican Council, in several documents, underscored the validity and necessity of the lay apostolate. Most notable are the two quoted above, Lumen Gentium and Current examples of the organized lay apostolate in the United States are The National Catholic Committee on Scouting, the Christian Family Movement, Serra International and Catholic interracial councils. With increased activity of the laity in the church, certain difficulties and dangers have arisen in the post-conciliar path of the lay faithful, states Pope John Paul II, In particular, two temptations can be cited which they have not always known how to avoid: the temptation of being so strongly interested in church services and tasks that some fail to become actively engaged in their responsibilities in the professional, social, cultural and political world; and the temptation of legitimizing the unwarranted separation of faith from life…” ( Christian Faithful – Christifideles laici In the role of the laity should always be “in conformity to their specific vocation, which is different from that of the sacred ministry. Their own field of evangelizing activity is the vast and complicated world of politics, society and economics, as well as the world of culture, of the sciences and the arts, of international life, of the mass media. It also includes other realities which are open to evangelization, such as human love, the family, the education of children and adolescents, professional work and suffering” ( 23).     

In the Catholic Church in the United States, more and more lay persons are participating in the work of the ordained clergy, being so strongly interested in church services and tasks, rather than bringing the Gospel message to the world outside of the church. They are often termed “ministers”. Pope John Paul, however, states that, “in fact, a person is not a minister simply in performing a task, but through sacramental ordination” ( Apostolatum actuositatem.The Lay, 2).Christifideles laici, Pope John Paul II notes thatChristifideles laici,Christifideles laici, 23).  Catholic Scouters, on their part, do fulfill the role of the lay apostolate. Their involvement in the secular realm of the Boy Scouts of America, gives them the opportunity to carry out the necessary task of evangelizing the secular world, especially through education of children and adolescents. Lay Scouters collaborate with their priest-chaplains to carry out the church’s mission in this area of American life. This program, Scouter Development: Lay Apostolate Formation for Scouting, responds to the direction given in Christifideles laici for forming the laity for their apostolates.
 
Groups, associations and movements also have their place in the formation of the lay faithful. In fact, they have the possibility, each with its own method, of offering a formation through a deeply shared experience in the apostolic life, as well as having the opportunity to integrate, to make concrete and specific the formation that their members receive from other persons and communities (Christifideles laici, 62).
 
Having been prepared through this Scouter Development program and through their continued prayer, education and experience, lay Catholic  Scouters will be better enabled to manifest the dignity of the laity as they fulfill the noble task of the lay apostolate.

Further reading The Second Vatican Council:  Apostolatum actuositatem (Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity), Lumen Gentium (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church), Gaudium et Spes (The Church in the Modern World). Christifideles laici

(The Lay Christian Faithful)

Pope John Paul II, 1988

“Some Questions Regarding Collaboration of Nonordained

Faithful in Priests’ Sacred Ministry”, The

Vatican. Made public on Nov. 13, 1997.